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The British Homefront - WW2

 

Britain was called the 'Home Front', because people felt that they were part of the war. The war affected everyone whether they were on the front line (fighting in Europe) or on the home front (back in Britain). Not everyone went to fight, but everyone helped in the 'war effort' in some way or other.

Evacuees, air raid shelters, gas masks, ID cards, queues for food, Local Defence Volunteers, The Home Guard, snap drills, sandbagging, searchlights, the Auxiliary Fire Service, barrage balloons – this was life in Britain in World War Two on the Home Front.

 

WW2 drew the people of the nation together and ignited a common spirit of defiance against its powerful enemy. By refusing to crumble, Britain was able to continue in the fight. 

Propaganda Posters

Propaganda Posters  1 Sarah P4O’H
Propaganda Posters  2 Alan P4O’H
Propaganda Posters  3 Kacper P4O’H
Propaganda Posters  4 Poppy P4O’H
Propaganda Posters  5 Maja P4O’H
Propaganda Posters  6 Maja P4O’H

Posters and Photographs - life during WW2

Posters and Photographs - life during WW2  1 Women went to work in factories during WW2
Posters and Photographs - life during WW2  2 Women joined the Women's Land Army
Posters and Photographs - life during WW2  3 Women joined the Women's Land Army
Posters and Photographs - life during WW2  4 Air Raid Wardens wanted
Posters and Photographs - life during WW2  5 What life was like on the Home Front during WW2
Posters and Photographs - life during WW2  6 People were reminded to wear their gas masks.
Posters and Photographs - life during WW2  7
Posters and Photographs - life during WW2  8
Posters and Photographs - life during WW2  9
Posters and Photographs - life during WW2  10
Posters and Photographs - life during WW2  11

Horrible Histories- World War Two Homeguard

The British Homeguard - Life in the Home Front

Horrible Histories WW2 - Stations

Living in Britain changed during WW2. How did it change?

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